ANCIENT VILLAGES AND TOTEM POLES OF THE NISG̱A'A

G̱alts’abim Ging̱olx - Village de Ging̱olx

Painting of Ging̱olx
1868 Painting of Ging̱olx

Painting of Ging̱olx
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Painting of Ging̱olx
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Painting of Ging̱olx
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Painting of Ging̱olx
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Painting of Ging̱olx
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Painting of Ging̱olx
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Painting of Ging̱olx
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Painting of Ging̱olx
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Nidii yayt t’aahl g̱alts’abim Ging̱olx wil wayt bakwhl g̱alipleet, iit t’aatdiithl g̱alts’ap dim wil ḵ’ap wanhl g̱asimutkwsit ahl 1867. N̓ihl ts’eets’ikshl t’aat ahl Saxwhl Lisims wil adigwil siilin̓skwhl Nisg̱a’a. Ii g̱a’aatdiit loot, nidiit naa ji wanit loot wilt adigwil tḵ’eskwhl Hay̓dax̱ g̱anhl Ts’imsan n̓idiit lax̱-ts’eets’iks tgun.

Ḵ̱’ap sgi g̱an gin̓amtkwhl wa ahl g̱alts’abim̓ Ging̱olx. Mahlkwshl adaawaḵhl g̱aniye’etgum̓ ahl hlidaa la’ooy̓. Wahl Ging̱olx-wilt n̓ii-maḵsa’anhl Nisg̱a’ahl g̱ag̱olxhl g̱aw̓ildigitgwit hlaa jahldiit. Maḵsa’andiit lax̱ts’eehl aks ahl Saxwhl Lisims. N̓it wilaakwdiit tgun dimt wilaa ax̱ huxw tḵ’esa’ahl g̱aw̓ildigitgwit. Hli g̱alaans gun, iit doḵhl Nisg̱a’ahl g̱a g̱olxhl w̓ildigitgwit iit n̓ii-maḵsa’andiit lax̱-nn̓il̓ugum g̱an, dim wilaat ga’ahl tx̱aa n̓itkwshl gathl bagwit ahl ḵ’alii-aks.

G̱alaanhl 1867, sii Ging̱olx (n̓ihl wilaayihl ḵ’amḵsiiwaa ahl Kincolith) n̓iwil sit’aatkwshl gisi-luxwlukwhl Nisg̱a’a, bakw n̓idiit ahl Git’iks ii Gwin̓ahaa. G̱abiihl lugwit ii g̱agwilks-at’itkwsdiit, ii hlag̱ats’uudiit ii gisi-luxwlukwdiit wil g̱aldix pdaalhl aks wil joḵdiit ḵ’alii-Lisims.

Ging̱olx was not a regular village until Christian missionaries established it as a permanent settlement in 1867. This flat site at the mouth of the Nass River had previously been used by the Nisg̱a’a as a hunting ground and a fishing station, but it was not permanently inhabited due to its vulnerability to attack from raiding bands of Haida and Tsimshian peoples.

The name Ging̱olx has its origin in this violent period of pre-contact history. Ging̱olx means “Place of Scalps”, a reference to an episode where the Nisg̱a’a are said to have hung the scalps of defeated warriors along the shoreline in order to deter future raiders. Following the massacre of a raiding group, the Nisg̱a’a took the scalps of the warriors and stuck them on tall wooden pikes where they would be plainly visible to anyone arriving by water.

After 1867, modern Ging̱olx (also known as Kincolith) was steadily populated by Nisg̱a’a families as they relocated from other Nass River villages such as Git’iks and Gwin̓ahaa. Some families relocated as they converted to Christianity, while others were forced to move when periodic flooding of the Nass destroyed their own villages.